physicistintraining

@physicistintraining
I swear 5 seconds ago this blog was cute puppies and science.
http://physicistintraining.tumblr.com/
galaxyclusters:

s-c-i-guy:

asapscience:


Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!
Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 
Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there


Reblogging for motivation

same, i need this rn

galaxyclusters:

s-c-i-guy:

asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!

Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 

Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

Reblogging for motivation

same, i need this rn

We assume others show love the same way we do — and if they don’t, we worry it’s not there.
Unknown  (via slutdiagnos)

ilovekartoffeln:

Bless this man

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dwarf Galaxies “Challenge Our Understanding of How the Universe Works”
"Early in 2013 we announced our startling discovery that half of the dwarf galaxies surrounding theAndromeda Galaxy are orbiting it in an immense plane,” said Geraint Lewis, of the University of Sydney's School of Physics. “This plane is more than a million light years in diameter, but is very thin, with a width of only 300 000 light years. Everywhere we looked we saw this strangely coherent coordinated motion of dwarf galaxies. From this we can extrapolate that these circular planes of dancing dwarfs are universal, seen in about 50 percent of galaxies,” Lewis added. “This is a big problem that contradicts our standard cosmological models. It challenges our understanding of how the universe works including the nature of dark matter.”
"Astronomers have been observing Andromeda since Persian astronomers first noted it over a thousand years ago, but it is only in the past decade that we have truly studied it in exquisite detail with the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey," said Lewis. "The Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey – cutely called PAndAS – is a large project that ran between 2008 and 2011, using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope situated on the Mauna Kea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Now that we’re examining the data it collected, it is providing our first panoramic view of our closest large companion in the cosmos," explained Lewis.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dwarf Galaxies “Challenge Our Understanding of How the Universe Works”

"Early in 2013 we announced our startling discovery that half of the dwarf galaxies surrounding theAndromeda Galaxy are orbiting it in an immense plane,” said Geraint Lewis, of the University of Sydney's School of Physics. “This plane is more than a million light years in diameter, but is very thin, with a width of only 300 000 light years. Everywhere we looked we saw this strangely coherent coordinated motion of dwarf galaxies. From this we can extrapolate that these circular planes of dancing dwarfs are universal, seen in about 50 percent of galaxies,” Lewis added. “This is a big problem that contradicts our standard cosmological models. It challenges our understanding of how the universe works including the nature of dark matter.”

"Astronomers have been observing Andromeda since Persian astronomers first noted it over a thousand years ago, but it is only in the past decade that we have truly studied it in exquisite detail with the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey," said Lewis. "The Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey – cutely called PAndAS – is a large project that ran between 2008 and 2011, using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope situated on the Mauna Kea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Now that we’re examining the data it collected, it is providing our first panoramic view of our closest large companion in the cosmos," explained Lewis.

Continue Reading

foodishouldnoteat:

Garlic butter pizza crust 

ryanpanos:

Scientific Diagrams | John Philipps Emslie | Via

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Fold a piece of paper in half 103 times, and its wider than the observable universe.
this is due to exponential growth; the increase in previous thickness is doubled each time you fold the piece of paper again. physically you could probably only fold a piece of paper about 7 - 8 times on your own.

Given a paper large enough—and enough energy—you can fold it as many times as you want. If you fold it 103 times, the thickness of your paper will be larger than the observable Universe; 93 billion light-years distance.
How can a 0.0039-inch-thick paper get to be as thick as the Universe?
The answer is simple: Exponential growth. The average paper thickness in 1/10th of a millimeter (0.0039 inches.) If you perfectly fold the paper in half, you will double its thickness.
Folding the paper in half a third time will get you about the thickness of a nail.
Seven folds will be about the thickness of a notebook of 128 pages.
10 folds and the paper will be about the width of a hand.
23 folds will get you to one kilometer—3,280 feet.
30 folds will get you to space. Your paper will be now 100 kilometers high.
Keep folding it. 42 folds will get you to the Moon. With 51 you will burn in the Sun.
Now fast forward to 81 folds and your paper will be 127,786 light-years, almost as thick as the Andromeda Galaxy, estimated at 141,000 light-years across.
90 folds will make your paper 130.8 million light-years across, bigger than the Virgo Supercluster, estimated at 110 million light-years. The Virgo Supercluster contains the Local Galactic Group—with Andromeda and our own Milky Way—and about 100 other galaxy groups.
And finally, at 103 folds, you will get outside of the observable Universe, which is estimated at 93 billion light-years in diameters.

[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Fold a piece of paper in half 103 times, and its wider than the observable universe.

this is due to exponential growth; the increase in previous thickness is doubled each time you fold the piece of paper again. physically you could probably only fold a piece of paper about 7 - 8 times on your own.

Given a paper large enough—and enough energy—you can fold it as many times as you want. If you fold it 103 times, the thickness of your paper will be larger than the observable Universe; 93 billion light-years distance.

How can a 0.0039-inch-thick paper get to be as thick as the Universe?

The answer is simple: Exponential growth. The average paper thickness in 1/10th of a millimeter (0.0039 inches.) If you perfectly fold the paper in half, you will double its thickness.

Folding the paper in half a third time will get you about the thickness of a nail.

Seven folds will be about the thickness of a notebook of 128 pages.

10 folds and the paper will be about the width of a hand.

23 folds will get you to one kilometer—3,280 feet.

30 folds will get you to space. Your paper will be now 100 kilometers high.

Keep folding it. 42 folds will get you to the Moon. With 51 you will burn in the Sun.

Now fast forward to 81 folds and your paper will be 127,786 light-years, almost as thick as the Andromeda Galaxy, estimated at 141,000 light-years across.

90 folds will make your paper 130.8 million light-years across, bigger than the Virgo Supercluster, estimated at 110 million light-years. The Virgo Supercluster contains the Local Galactic Group—with Andromeda and our own Milky Way—and about 100 other galaxy groups.

And finally, at 103 folds, you will get outside of the observable Universe, which is estimated at 93 billion light-years in diameters.

[source]

wildcat2030:

Is our universe a bubble in the multiverse?
-
Researchers at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics are working to bring the multiverse hypothesis — we are living in one universe of many — into the realm of testable science. Perimeter Associate Faculty member Matthew Johnson and his team are looking for clues for the existence of multiverses (a.ka. parallel universes) in the cosmic microwave background data, assumed to be left over from the Big Bang. To do that, “we simulate the whole universe,” he says. “We start with a multiverse that has two bubbles in it, we collide the bubbles on a computer to figure out what happens, and then we stick a virtual observer in various places and ask what that observer would see from there.” For example, if another universe had collided with ours n the early universe, it would have left evidence in the form of a “a disk on the sky,” creating a “bruise” in the pattern, he says. That the search for such a disk has so far come up empty makes certain collision-filled models less likely.

Meanwhile, the team is at work figuring out what other kinds of evidence a bubble collision might leave behind. It’s the first time, the team writes in their paper, that anyone has produced a direct quantitative set of predictions for the observable signatures of bubble collisions. And though none of those signatures has so far been found, some of them are possible to look for.

The real significance of this work is as a proof of principle: it shows that the multiverse can be testable. In other words, if we are living in a bubble universe, we might actually be able to tell.

Abstract of Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics paper

The theory of eternal inflation in an inflaton potential with multiple vacua predicts that our universe is one of many bubble universes nucleating and growing inside an ever-expanding false vacuum. The collision of our bubble with another could provide an important observational signature to test this scenario. We develop and implement an algorithm for accurately computing the cosmological observables arising from bubble collisions directly from the Lagrangian of a single scalar field. We first simulate the collision spacetime by solving Einstein’s equations, starting from nucleation and ending at reheating. Taking advantage of the collision’s hyperbolic symmetry, the simulations are performed with a 1+1-dimensional fully relativistic code that uses adaptive mesh refinement. We then calculate the comoving curvature perturbation in an open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, which is used to determine the temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For a fiducial Lagrangian, the anisotropies are well described by a power law in the cosine of the angular distance from the center of the collision signature. For a given form of the Lagrangian, the resulting observational predictions are inherently statistical due to stochastic elements of the bubble nucleation process. Further uncertainties arise due to our imperfect knowledge about inflationary and pre-recombination physics. We characterize observational predictions by computing the probability distributions over four phenomenological parameters which capture these intrinsic and model uncertainties. This represents the first fully-relativistic set of predictions from an ensemble of scalar field models giving rise to eternal inflation, yielding significant differences from previous non-relativistic approximations. Thus, our results provide a basis for a rigorous confrontation of these theories with cosmological data.

(via Is our universe a bubble in the multiverse? | KurzweilAI)

2=0 in the same way as 1/2 and 1/4 are the same number.
Abstract algebra professor (via mathprofessorquotes)

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